June 2, 2020

Black Lives Matter

Black Lives Matter

Today, instead of listening to our usual 45-minute episode, we’re asking you to take that time to listen, read, or watch content that elevates black voices, black stories, and black-owned businesses.

Today, instead of listening to our usual 45-minute episode, we’re asking you to take that time to listen, read, or watch content that elevates black voices, black stories, and black-owned businesses.

 

Podcasts:

  • The 1619 Project from the New York Times Magazine is a multimedia initiative that began last August to mark the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. It reframes American history by exploring the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans. Check out the entire project on the Times’s site, and listen to the podcast portion, simply called 1619.
  • We’re also huge fans of NPR’s Code Switch. The podcast covers what they call “overlapping themes of race, ethnicity and culture, how they play out in our lives and communities, and how all of this is shifting.”
  • The Ringer’s show Higher Learning has an episode titled “The Importance of the Nationwide Protests Over George Floyd’s Death.” If you want insight on where we go from here, this has it.

 

Books:

 

Videos:

  • Rachel Cargle’s YouTube video titled “Public Address On Revolution: Revolution Now” is a moving assessment of today’s reality. 
  • On Netflix, check out 13th from Ava Duvernay to understand the U.S. prison system’s history of racial inequality.

 

You can also support black businesses. Find great compilations of those businesses on WeBuyBlack, The Black Wallet, and Official Black Wall Street.

 

Finally, if you’re in the position to give, consider donating to one of the many reputable organizations helping further anti-racism causes.

 

For more information about anti-racism or resources for further learning, look here, here, and here.


Transcript

Kinsey Grant, Morning Brew business editor and podcast host [00:00:00] Hey, everyone, and welcome to Business Casual. It is me, your host, Kinsey Grant. I want to start by saying three simple words that bear repeating today and every single day: Black Lives Matter. I know you're used to hearing me interview a big name in business about a big question in business every Tuesday, but this Tuesday is different. It needs to be different. Every day, from here on out, needs to be different. Because as so many people around the country, my colleagues at Morning Brew included, have said over the last few days, George Floyd's life matters, Breonna Taylor's life matters, Ahmaud Arbery's life matters. Black lives matter. 


Kinsey [00:00:42] And yet, across the United States, in cities of all sizes, there is unrest. And that unrest is rooted in underserved and overprofiled groups being subjected to brutality, injustice, and inequality for centuries. So right now, I'd like to take a moment of silence to think about how the last several days fit into history, to consider where this experience might take us, and most importantly, to honor the victims of systemic racism. [one minute of silence] Thank you. Throughout the last week, some in the business community have stepped up, offering supportive words and more importantly, actions to back those words up. But, others have been silent and silence is compliance. 


Kinsey [00:02:24] So today, instead of listening to our usual 45-minute episode, we're asking you to instead take that time to listen, read, or watch content that elevates black voices, black stories, and black businesses. So here we go. 


Kinsey [00:02:38] If you're looking to listen to some great podcasts, here's what we at Business Casual and Morning Brew recommend. The 1619 Project from the New York Times Magazine is a multimedia initiative that began last August to mark the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. It reframes American history by exploring the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans. Check out the entire project on the Times' site. It is truly incredible, and listen to the podcast portion, which is simply called 1619. 


Kinsey [00:03:10] We're also enormous fans of NPR's Code Switch. Code Switch covers what they call, quote, overlapping themes of race, ethnicity, and culture, how they play out in our lives and communities, and how all of this is shifting. Can you think of a better time to start educating ourselves on that overlap and more importantly, that shift? I cannot. 


Kinsey [00:03:31] And finally, The Ringer show "Higher Learning" has an episode titled The Importance of the Nationwide Protests Over George Floyd's Death. If you want insight on where we go from here, this is where you should start. Now, if you would like to read instead of listen, we recommend the book "White Fragility" by Robin DiAngelo. It has been recommended online a ton over the last several days and there is most certainly a reason for that. The book explores why white people feel so uncomfortable talking about race. But, right now it is time to talk about race, and it's important to understand why that conversation can feel so unnerving for some groups. 


Kinsey [00:04:09] For a better understanding of the historical challenges of being black and doing business, we recommend Hannibal Johnson's "Black Wall Street From Riot to Renaissance in Tulsa's Historic Greenwood District." And finally, another option is just to read some of the incredible classics by black authors, including Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, Maya Angelou, just to name a couple. If you are looking for something to watch, Rachel Cargle's YouTube video titled Public Address on Revolution: Revolution Now is a moving assessment of today's reality. Rachel, who is an academic and an advocate at the intersection of race and womanhood, addresses what's going on today with a three-pronged approach of knowledge, empathy, and action. 


Kinsey [00:04:53] And lastly, on Netflix, we recommend "13th" from incredible director Ava DuVernay to understand the U.S. prison system's history of racial inequality. Now, finally, if you're in the position to give, consider donating to one of the many reputable organizations helping further anti-racism causes. Morning Brew is donating $5,000 to the Equal Justice Initiative, which is a nonprofit that challenges racial injustice, works for criminal justice reform, and advocates for basic human rights. 


Kinsey [00:05:24] The team behind Business Casual is donating an additional $2,500, and we're asking you to contribute too. And also just support black businesses. Find great compilations of those black businesses on WeBuyBlack, the Black Wallet, and Official Black Wall Street. This is a lot, so I am including a list of all of these resources, plus a collection of many, many more, in the show notes for this episode. You can also find this information at businesscasual.fm/blm. 


Kinsey [00:05:55] I encourage you to read more, listen more, research more. That's what we'll be doing and we hope that you will join us. I've struggled to find the right words to explain what's going on right now and how we, at this podcast, are planning to be and to do better. It's not an easy topic to talk about. After all, this show is supposed to be insightful, but also fun and entertaining and casual. But having the hard conversations is what we need most right now. None of us grow when we say comfortable. Business Casual's purpose is to cut through the clutter to answer the biggest questions in business. 


Kinsey [00:06:31] So we are doubling down on that goal of bringing you voices worth hearing. And to our black listeners, we see you, we hear you, and we support you. We're not going to avoid the hard topics. We are going to actively push ourselves to think differently, to think about the people of color whose stories and voices we need to elevate, to talk to a diverse group of people about issues in business so we can represent the full spectrum of experiences in business. We'll be utilizing the very resources that I just told you about at the top of this episode to think about things like black-owned businesses' access to PPP, or even the hurdles to traditional banking systems and capital access for people of color. 


Kinsey [00:07:13] And the many of you out there listening, who have already emailed or DMed me in the past, know that I respond to every single piece of feedback that I get. Any message—I will respond. So if you have ideas or tips, resources, anything—send me a message. I am all ears, today and every day, because this is a conversation that needs to keep happening, even when the headlines aren't on page one anymore. We want to hear from you, and we want to know what you're thinking, what your experiences have been, how we can better serve. 


Kinsey [00:07:44] What are you and your friends and family talking about right now? If you want to reach out and talk, I am on Twitter, @kinseygrant, and at my email, Kinsey@morningbrew.com. That's k i n s e y @morningbrew.com. Thank you so much for listening, and I will see you next time.